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Idaho Virtualization Laboratory
IVL Mission Statement

Mission

Idaho Virtualization Laboratory

To democratize science, facilitate scientific research and collaboration, improve education and outreach, and to better preserve natural and cultural history collections stored in museums and other scientific repositories through the use of modern informatics and visualization techniques.

Overview of the IVL

The Idaho Virtualization Laboratory (IVL) is a integrative, multidisciplinary research laboratory at Idaho State University (ISU) and is located within the Idaho Museum of Natural History. The lab facility houses technology for the development of virtual files containing three-dimensional data for selected objects.

The data are generated using surface scanners. The IVL houses seven laser surface scanners for small and medium-sized objects. The IVL does not as yet have CT scanning capabilities, but can facilitate high-level software for the processing of CT data generated elsewhere.

The work of the IVL is two-fold:

First, the equipment housed at the IVL is intended for use in the virtual archiving of valuable museum collections, materials from archaeological and paleontological excavations, faunal remains, and all other applicable aspects of cultural and natural history. Many items of this field, such as those housed in museum and teaching collections, are perishable or easily damaged by repeated handling. The goal in creating virtual archives of such collections is to preserve the integrity of the specimens and provide alternative access to collections.

Second, the IVL serves as a laboratory for applying this technology to research, teaching, and outreach projects developed by scientists and educators. We openly encourage interdepartmental research, and have an open door policy to all earnest scientific endeavors conducted by our colleagues here at Idaho State University, local and regional administrative agencies, and other academic institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

What's this?

Virtual collection from the Hot Springs site, Moller Bay, Alaska.